Patient Requests for Specific Drugs Have Major Impact on Prescribing, Reports Study in Medical Care

Results Raise Questions on Safety Issues and Costs Related to ‘Direct-to-Consumer’ Advertising

Philadelphia, Pa. (March 14, 2014) – Patient requests for specific medications—including requests for brand-name drugs spurred by direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising—have a substantial impact on doctors’ prescribing decisions, suggests a study in the April issue of Medical CareThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

“A patient request for a specific medication dramatically increases the rate at which physician s prescribe that medication,” according to the new research led by John B. McKinlay, PhD, of New England Research Institutes, Watertown, Mass.  They add, “These results highlight potential negative impacts of DTC advertising and other forms of activation in medication requests.”

How Do Doctors Respond When Patients Request Specific Drugs?

The researchers designed an experimental study to evaluate the effects of “activated” patient requests for specific medications.  They made videos in which professional actors portrayed patients with two common, painful conditions:  sciatica causing back and leg pain or osteoatrthritis causing knee pain.

Half of the “patients” with sciatica specifically requested oxycodone, a strong narcotic painkiller; while half of the patients with knee arthritis requested the prescription drug Celebrex.  The other half of patients requested “just something to make it better.”

The patients requesting oxycodone said they had tried their spouse’s leftover medication; those requesting Celebrex said they saw it advertised, and that a co-worker took it and said it really helped.  The video scenarios were randomly shown to 192 primary care physicians, who were then asked a series of questions about diagnosis and management, including what treatment they would recommend.

The results suggested that “activated” patient requests for drugs had a strong effect on recommended treatments.  About 20 percent of sciatica patients requesting oxycodone would receive it, compared to one percent of those making no specific request.  Strong narcotic pain relievers such as oxycodone are generally not recommended for sciatica, particularly for a newly presenting case, such as was in these cases.

About half of knee arthritis patients requesting Celebrex would receive that drug, compared to one-fourth of those requesting no specific medication.  Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Celebrex are recommended for treatment of knee arthritis.  However, the brand-name drug Celebrex is a “selective” NSAID that is much more expensive than other options, with no additional benefit. The gender, race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status of the patient had no effect on the inclination to grant a patients’ request.

Results Raise Questions about Impact of DTC Advertising

Even if they didn’t receive the specific drug they requested, treatment patterns differed for patients who made active requests.  “Patients requesting oxycodone were more likely to receive a strong narcotic and less likely to receive a weak narcotic,” according to Dr McKinlay and colleagues.  “Patients requesting Celebrex were much less likely to receive a non-selective NSAID.”

The findings add to concerns over the potential safety and economic impact of prescription drug requests driven by DTC advertising.  The United States is one of only two countries that permit DTC advertising—familiar to television viewers as “Ask Your Doctor” ads—for prescription drugs.

There is continued debate over the impact of DTC advertising.  “Supporters defend the practice as a way to empower consumers, while opponents argue that commercially motivated messages leads to inappropriate patient requests for medication,” comments Dr G. Caleb Alexander, Deputy Editor of Medical Care. “In order to resolve this debate, more research is needed to determine the effects of DTC advertising on patient and physician behavior, especially how it affects prescribing decisions and health outcomes.”

The new report is one of the few rigorous experimental studies to evaluate the impact of DTC advertising.  Since DTC advertising is exclusively used for expensive medications, patient requests for specific medications “activated” by ads are likely to increase medication costs.

In addition, some activated requests may sometimes lead to suboptimal care—for example, patients receiving oxycodone for sciatica or Celebrex for arthritis might have more side effects, compared to alternative medications.  “The results highlight the ongoing need for improving strategies for patient-physician communication,” Dr McKinlay and coauthors conclude. 

About Medical Care

Rated as one of the top ten journals in health care administration, Medical Care is devoted to all aspects of the administration and delivery of health care. This scholarly journal publishes original, peer-reviewed papers documenting the most current developments in the rapidly changing field of health care. Medical Care provides timely reports on the findings of original investigations into issues related to the research, planning, organization, financing, provision, and evaluation of health services. In addition, numerous special supplementary issues that focus on specialized topics are produced with each volume. Medical Care is the official journal of the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Internal Medicine, Publications | Leave a comment

Bone Lengthening Technique Proves Useful in Patients with Cleft Palate

The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery Also Reports on an Unusual Soccer Injury and Patients Who Are ‘Too Frail for Surgery’

Philadelphia, Pa. (March 14, 2014) – A technique called distraction osteogenesis can create increased length of the upper jaw in patients with cleft lip and palate deformities, reports a study in the March issue of The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, edited by Mutaz B. Habal, MD, published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Distraction Technique Used to Lengthen the Palate

Dr. Emeka Nkenke of Erlangen University Hospital, Germany, and colleagues, report on the use of distraction osteogenesis to lengthen the maxilla (upper jaw) bone in patients with cleft lip and palate. In this technique, hardware is placed to gradually “stretch” bone in the desired direction. The researchers studied the bone-lengthening approach because the maxilla often regresses toward its original position after standard surgical advancement techniques.

Distraction osteogenesis was used in seven adolescent to young adult patients with cleft lip and palate deformities and “maxillary hypoplasia” (very small maxilla). The technique successfully increased the length of the maxilla by an average of 6.4 millimeters. During follow-up, the new bone regressed significantly—by about 7.5 percent. However, that was much less than the 50 percent or greater regression that can occur after standard surgical approaches.

Complications included an infection in one patient and loosening of the distraction hardware in another. Dr. Nkenke and coauthors conclude that, when needed to create maxillary bone length of no more than 12 millimeters, the benefits of the distraction osteogenesis technique outweigh the risks.

Another paper in the March issue includes a report of a very unusual complication from a sports-related injury.

Three Months after Soccer Injury, an Unusual Complication

Dr. Nebil Yeşiloğlu and colleagues of Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, report the unusual case of a man with an infected, draining wound on his chin. Three months earlier, he had been kicked in the jaw during a soccer game. He had a small cut at the time, which healed over.

X-rays and CT scans showed a vague abnormality of the jaw bone, but couldn’t identify the cause of the wound. On operating, the surgeons were surprised to discover a two-centimeter plastic cleat from a soccer shoe, embedded close to the bone.

After the cleat was removed and the area was cleaned, the wound healed without further problems. The authors highlight the need to carefully assess the patient’s history for clues as to possible unusual foreign bodies that may not appear on x-rays.

About The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, which is celebrating 25 years of publication in 2014, serves as a forum of communication for all those involved in craniofacial and maxillofacial surgery. Coverage ranges from practical aspects of craniofacial surgery to the basic science that underlies surgical practice. Affiliates include 14 major specialty societies around the world, including the American Association of Pediatric Plastic Surgeons, the American Academy of Pediatrics Section of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, the American Society of Craniofacial Surgeons, the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Argentine Society of Plastic Surgery Section of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, the Asian Pacific Craniofacial Association, the Association of Military Plastic Surgeons of the U.S., the Brazilian Society of Craniofacial Surgeons, the European Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the International Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Japanese Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Korean Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Thai Cleft and Craniofacial Association, and the World Craniofacial Foundation.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Publications, Surgery, Surgery - Plastic and Reconstructive | Leave a comment

Nursing2014 Journal Endorsed by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS)

Philadelphia, PA – March 13, 2014) – Wolters Kluwer Health is pleased to announce today that Nursing2014, a peer-reviewed journal of clinical excellence, has been endorsed by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), a global, cause-based, not-for-profit organization focused on better health through information technology (IT). Nursing2014 is part of Wolters Kluwer Health’s Lippincott Williams & Wilkins journal portfolio that also includes Nursing Management, endorsed by HIMSS since 2003.

As part of the endorsement, Nursing2014’s 170,000 subscribers will benefit from a monthly healthcare IT column written by various members of the Society’s Nursing Informatics Committee. The content will address the challenges that clinical nurses encounter while using patient care technology to enhance safety and efficiency.

“Increasingly, nurses are impacted by health information technology as more organizations implement electronic health records,” says Joyce Sensmeier, MS, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FHIMSS, FAAN, Vice President of Informatics at HIMSS. “We’re pleased to partner with Nursing2014 and share best practices and timely resources to equip practicing nurses.”

“This is a tremendous honor to work with HIMSS, one of the world’s leading proponents of optimizing healthcare engagement through technology, to give the nursing community important information they can use to improve safety and patient care,” said Jennifer Brogan, Vice President Nursing, Health & Wellness Publishing, Wolters Kluwer Health, Medical Research. “The Nursing2014 editorial and publishing teams are excited to begin working with their counterparts at HIMSS.”

About the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS)

HIMSS is a global, cause-based, not-for-profit organization focused on better health through information technology (IT). HIMSS leads efforts to optimize health engagements and care outcomes using information technology.

HIMSS is a cause-based, global enterprise producing health IT thought leadership, education, events, market research and media services around the world. Founded in 1961, HIMSS encompasses more than 52,000 individuals, of which more than two-thirds work in healthcare provider, governmental and not-for-profit organizations across the globe, plus over 600 corporations and 250 not-for-profit partner organizations, that share this cause.  HIMSS, headquartered in Chicago, serves the global health IT community with additional offices in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in Nursing, Publications, Technology | Leave a comment

What’s New in Autism Spectrum Disorder? Harvard Review of Psychiatry Presents Research Update

New Findings on Topics Ranging from Genetic Causes to Meeting the Needs of College Students ‘On the Spectrum’

Philadelphia, Pa. (March 10, 2014) – Recent years have seen exciting progress in key areas of research on autism spectrum disorders (ASD):  from possible genetic causes, to effective treatments for common symptoms and clinical problems, to promoting success for young people with ASD entering college.  Updates on these and other advances in ASD research are presented in the March special issue of Harvard Review of PsychiatryThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

“Autism is one of the most challenging disorders to treat and the public health concerns associated with the disorder are numerous due to its burden on the individual, on the family and on society,” write guest editors Drs Jean A. Frazier of University of Massachusetts Medical School and Christopher J. McDougle of Harvard Medical School.  The special issue provides a timely update on research into the causes, important clinical issues, and evidence-based treatments for ASD.

Updates on ASD Research in Six Key Areas

Leading experts provide state-of-the-art reviews on six topics: the genetics of ASD; the use of psychoactive drugs; symptoms of special clinical problems, including obesity, gastrointestinal problems, and sensory issues; and transitioning to college.

Genetics.  Over the last few years, there have been “unprecedented advances” in understanding the genetic causes of ASD.  Hundreds of genes conferring varying degrees of ASD risk have been identified to date.  Many of these genes also appear to be risk factors for related neurodevelopmental disorders and psychiatric problems.  While many unanswered questions remain, it may soon be possible to make specific genetic diagnoses in children with ASD.

Psychoactive medications. Despite limited evidence, psychotropic drugs are widely used to manage behavior problems and mental health disorders in children with ASD.  For medication classes—including antidepressants and stimulants—effectiveness may differ for youth versus adults with ASD.  New treatments affecting specific neurotransmitters and the hormone oxytocin are under development, and may help in targeting the “core symptoms” of ASD.

Obesity.  Obesity is a common problem with a major impact on the health of children with ASD.  Some ASD-related genes may also promote obesity; the same is true for antipsychotic drugs used to help manage behavior problems.  Other contributing factors may include sleep disorders and barriers to getting enough exercise.  Childhood obesity and related health issues may be a “significant threat” to the health and quality of life of children with ASD.

Gastrointestinal issues.  Children with ASD also have high rates of gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders.  Some genes linked to ASD may also play a role in gastrointestinal disturbances, with a possible link to immune system dysfunction.  There’s also emerging evidence of a potential “gut-brain” connection, with gastrointestinal dysfunction contributing to the development or severity of ASD symptoms.

Sensory symptoms.  Children with ASD have various abnormalities of sensory function, including both over- and under-responsivity as well as “sensory seeking behavior.” Although the neurobiology of these sensory symptoms remains unclear, some researchers suggest they are related to known abnormalities of brain structure and function.  Recent studies show that sensory symptoms are related to other ASD-related symptoms and behaviors; more research is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of “sensory integration therapy” and other occupational therapy approaches.

Preparing for college.  The final article highlights the need for new approaches to meeting the needs of “high-functioning” ASD patients entering college.  Students “on the spectrum” transitioning to college are at risk of both academic and social problems, and may benefit from accommodation and supports.  Based on a growing body of research, a set of recommendations for developing more effective transition plans for children with ASD are proposed.

Along with the editors of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, Drs Frazier and McDougal hope their special issue will provide a useful update for clinicians caring for the growing numbers of individuals and families living with ASD.  They conclude, “Clearly, more research is needed on every level for the field to help support and treat individuals on the spectrum so that they can optimize their developmental trajectory and as adults become integral members of our work force.” 

About the Harvard Review of Psychiatry

The Harvard Review of Psychiatry is the authoritative source for scholarly reviews and perspectives on a diverse range of important topics in psychiatry. Founded by the Harvard Medical School Department of Psychiatry, the journal is peer-reviewed and not industry sponsored. It is the property of Harvard University and is affiliated with all of the Departments of Psychiatry at the Harvard teaching hospitals.  Articles encompass all major issues in contemporary psychiatry, including (but not limited to) neuroscience, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, history of psychiatry, and ethics.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Psychiatry, Psychology and Addiction Medicine, Publications | Leave a comment

Prehospital Alerts Let Stroke Patients Skip the Emergency Room

Going Directly for CT Scans Can Shorten the Time to Emergency Treatment, Says Study in Neurosurgery

Philadelphia, Pa. (March 5, 2014) – Prehospital stroke alerts by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel can shorten the time to effective treatment with “clot-busting” drugs for patients with stroke, according to a report in the March issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Dr. Mandy J. Binning and colleagues at the Capital Institute for Neurosciences (CIN) at Capital Health, Trenton and Pennington, N.J., implemented a prehospital stroke alert (PHSA) protocol in a specialized neurological emergency department (ED) setting. The PHSA approach allows patients with probable stroke to bypass the ED and go for immediate computed tomography (CT) scanning—saving valuable minutes in emergency treatment of stroke.

Trained EMS Personnel Issue Prehospital Stroke Alerts…

The PHSA system was introduced at Capital Health’s two neurological EDs to facilitate emergency treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Intravenous tPA can dissolve the clot that’s causing the stroke. However, to be effective, treatment must be started within 4.5 hours after initial stroke symptoms. Ideally, the “door-to-needle” time—from arrival at the hospital to the start of tPA treatment—should be less than one hour.

In the PHSA approach, specialists at the CIN gave EMS personnel special training in identifying stroke patients. After training, the EMS personnel could send a prenotification to the hospital, letting the ED team know that a patient with possible stroke was on the way.

After issuing a PHSA, the EMS personnel brought the patient directly to the CT suite, bypassing the usual ED routines.  They were met by the neurological emergency team, which performed a quick assessment and CT scan of the brain. If stroke was confirmed in the appropriate time frame, tPA treatment was started immediately.

The new study reports on 141 patients with prehospital stroke alerts who were stable enough to bypass the ED and go directly to CT. The EMS personnel made an accurate assessment of stroke in two thirds of patients, and correctly identified patients with neurological conditions nearly 90 percent of the time.

…Saving Valuable Time to Emergency Stroke Treatment

On average, CT scans were performed about 12 minutes after the patient arrived at the hospital—compared to 35 minutes before the PHSA system was introduced.

The median door-to-needle time was 57 minutes, compared to 99 minutes before the PHSA system. The overall percentage of stroke patients receiving tPA was 18 percent, compared to an average of five percent over the previous three years.

Despite the documented benefits of clot-dissolving drugs for patients with stroke and recommendations for rapid treatment, only a small percentage of stroke patients actually receive tPA. Hospital prenotification by EMS providers has been recommended to speed ED evaluation of patients with possible stroke. The new study shows that combining PHSAs with treatment at a specialized neurological ED can shorten the time to CT scanning and, when appropriate, tPA treatment in patients with stroke.

Dr. Binning and colleagues note that door-to-needle times have continued to decrease since the introduction of the PHSA protocol. They also report that they’re seeing increased numbers of stroke patients—likely because EMS personnel are preferentially transporting patients with probable stroke to the neurological EDs, where they can receive specialized stroke care.

The improvements in door-to-CT and door-to-needle times “suggest that we are triaging and treating patients with acute neurological and neurosurgical emergencies more quickly,” Dr. Binning and coauthors write. They are planning further studies to compare clinical outcomes in stroke patients treated before and after introduction of the PHSA protocol.

About Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, the Official Journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, is your most complete window to the contemporary field of neurosurgery. Members of the Congress and non-member subscribers receive 3,000 pages per year packed with the very latest science, technology, and medicine, not to mention full-text online access to the world’s most complete, up-to-the-minute neurosurgery resource. For professionals aware of the rapid pace of developments in the field, Neurosurgery is nothing short of indispensable.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Publications, Surgery - Neurosurgery | Leave a comment

Wolters Kluwer Health to Distribute Northern Light’s Life Sciences Conference Abstracts Collection

Ovid to Offer Important Grey Literature Critical to Systematic Reviews

New York, NY (March 3, 2014)Wolters Kluwer Health is pleased to announce a partnership with Northern Light to distribute the Northern Light Life Sciences Conference Abstracts collection through its OvidSP medical research platform reaching thousands of institutional subscribers worldwide.

Northern Light’s Life Sciences Conference Abstracts is a bibliographic database containing abstracts and posters from more than one million research papers delivered at 1,400 life sciences industry events over the past four years. New conferences are added as the abstracts are posted. This rich, early data in the grey literature is critical to researchers conducting systematic reviews. The information is targeted to research scientists at pharmaceutical and biotech companies, healthcare organizations, academic institutions, research libraries, and research teams at hospitals.

“With Northern Light Life Sciences Conference Abstracts, we can offer Ovid users highly focused and important grey literature for life and biosciences research,” said Andrew Richardson, Vice President, Business Development at Wolters Kluwer Health, Medical Research. “Conference abstracts fill an important gap in the literature that is valuable content for researchers who need the latest data findings to support their work.”

“Our conference abstract database is a uniquely useful content set for life sciences and pharmaceutical research. Through this partnership with Wolters Kluwer Health, we now have a tremendous channel in Ovid to get this content into the hands of thousands of practitioners,” said C. David Seuss, Northern Light’s CEO.

About Northern Light

Northern Light has been providing strategic research portals, business research content, and search and text analytics technology to global enterprises since 1996.  Northern Light’s current clients include Fortune 100 leaders across multiple industries such as information technology, life sciences, financial services, telecommunications, manufacturing, and consumer products. Headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, Northern Light has unique content aggregation partnerships with more than 150 of the world’s leading syndicated technology and industry research publishers. Northern Light, along with Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT), is a charter member of the Center for Complex Systems and Enterprises at the Stevens Institute of Technology

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Publications | Leave a comment

Wolters Kluwer Health Named Publisher of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

The Top-Recognized Clinical Review Journal in Orthopaedics Joins LWW Portfolio

NEW YORK (February 26, 2014)—Wolters Kluwer Health and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)—the preeminent provider of musculoskeletal education to orthopaedic surgeons and others in the world—announced today an agreement to publish the Academy’s official clinical review journal effective with the March 2014 issue. The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS) will be published under the Lippincott Williams & Wilkins journal portfolio (LWW), providing print and digital access for AAOS members, individual subscribers, and institutional users. JAAOS reaches more than 38,000 AAOS members worldwide as a highly recognized journal providing comprehensive support on daily patient care, surgical techniques and more.

“The Academy has always been committed to providing peer-reviewed bone and joint health education to our members and the general public, and we look forward to growing our JAAOS readership with Wolters Kluwer Health,” added AAOS Chief Executive Officer Karen L. Hackett, CAE, FACHE. “LWW has a strong and proven publishing record in expanding subscriber lists, especially into international areas, where we hope to reach practitioners in need of the latest surgical techniques and care strategies.”

LWW will enhance JAAOS publication channels with print, digital and mobile platforms. Academy members will have mobile access to JAAOS content through a free iPad® app downloadable from iTunes. Institutional libraries such as hospitals, medical schools, and corporations will be able to access JAAOS through the HighWire or Ovid platforms. Ovid, part of Wolters Kluwer Health, is a world-class medical research platform used by more than 12,500 institutions globally.

A new feature to JAAOS will be the addition of LWW’s publish-ahead-of-print production delivering articles online soon after acceptance. Also planned for JAAOS is an open access option; following a manuscript’s acceptance for publication, authors will, for a fee, be able to stipulate that the article be made freely available to all who wish to read it. The LWW partnership also will continue JAAOS’s participation in HINARI (Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative), providing physicians in designated developing nations access to JAAOS at little or no cost to the doctors.

“It is a tremendous honor to be named publisher of record by one of the world’s most prestigious medical associations, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons,” said Jayne Marks, Vice President of Publishing at Wolters Kluwer Health, Medical Research. “Not surprising today, the rise in orthopaedic healthcare is increasing across all populations worldwide. And we are ready to begin our partnership to accelerate access and reach to JAAOS for practitioners globally helping them to improve the lives of their patients.”

About the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

With more than 38,000 members, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (aaos.org or orthoinfo.org), is the premier not-for-profit organization that provides education programs for orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals, champions the interests of patients and advances the highest quality of musculoskeletal health. Orthopaedic surgeons and the Academy are the authoritative sources of information for patients and the general public on musculoskeletal conditions, treatments and related issues. When orthopaedic surgeons restore mobility and reduce pain, they help people get back to work and to independent, productive lives.

To learn more, to read hundreds of patient stories or to submit your own story, visit ANationInMotion.org. Like AAOS on Facebook (www.facebook.com/AAOS1), and follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/AAOS1).

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Orthopedics, Publications | Leave a comment

Psychiatric Nursing Specialists Played Key Role in Response to Boston Marathon Bombing

Report in Clinical Nurse Specialist Outlines Psychiatric APNs’ Contributions to Promoting Psychological Health and Resiliency after Disasters

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 28, 2014) – Psychiatric advanced practice nurses (APNs) played a critical role in supporting psychological recovery after the Boston Marathon bombing—not only for injured patients, but also for family members and hospital staff, according to an article in Clinical Nurse Specialist, official journal of the the National Association of Clinical Nurse SpecialistsThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Barbara Lakatos, DNP, PMHCNS-BC, and colleagues of the Psychiatric Nursing Resource Service at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) describe the steps they took in managing psychological responses to trauma in the aftermath of the 2013 Boston Marathon attack.  They write, “Emotional reactions were dramatic but were eased by the psychological care and education that our patients, their families, and staff received in the first days to weeks after the bombings.”

Psychiatric APNs Share ‘Comprehensive Response’ to Marathon Bombings

Within minutes after the bombing, 39 patients with multiple injuries arrived at BWH’s level I trauma center.  “The sheer number of patients arriving in the ED simultaneously, with catastrophic blast, burn, and shrapnel injuries was extraordinary even by our standards,”  Dr Lakatos and coauthors write.  “The magnitude of this event and its effect on our hospital required a comprehensive response that would promote resiliency and healing.”

Informed by responses to the September 11 attacks and other recent disasters, psychiatric APNs followed a “trauma informed care” framework—designed to emphasize the “strength, resiliency, physical, psychological and emotional care and safety for staff and survivors as they are cared for and recover from injuries.”  The scope of the Psychiatric Nursing Resource Service within BWH  ”placed us in an ideal position to take a leadership role in shaping the organization’s psychological response to this event,” according to the authors.

In addition to tending to the psychological impact on the trauma victims, the psychiatric nursing specialists played a critical role in responding to the needs of the large numbers of family members present at the hospital.  “Anxiety and fear were high and we realized that an immediate response to provide family members information and a forum to be heard would prevent an escalation of tension,” Dr Lakatos and coauthors write.

Within 24 hours, an “impromptu multi-family support group” was established.  “We met in the only room large enough for the group, provided nourishment and invited them to tell us who they were and who they were there to support.”  Psychiatric APNs informed family members about the physical and psychological care the patients would receive and the range of supports available.  Family members were also advised to take care of themselves, so as to be in the best position to help their loved ones when they returned home.

Psychological Support for Staff Is Important Too

“Knowing that the plans of care for patients and their families were in place we were able to focus our efforts on the staff to ensure they received what they needed to continue to provide care,” Dr Lakatos and colleagues write.  On each unit treating bombing victims, health care providers were provided with mental health information and support.  Like the families, staff were encouraged to sleep, eat a healthy diet, and take other steps to promote physical health and emotional wellness.  Patients, families, and staff alike were also advised to avoid reminders of the event and limit the number of people in their lives asking them about the trauma and recovery.

As patients began to recover physically, staff received advice in helping to manage the wide range of emotional reactions.  “Coaching nurses on what to say to support patients’ and families’ psychological health was equal in importance to acknowledging the range of emotional responses they would experience while providing care to patients,” according to the authors.  Staff were offered a wide range of group and individual supports, helping them feel like they were “beginning to return to normal” within a few weeks.

Dr Lakatos and colleagues believe that their experience at BWH has important lessons for hospitals planning their response to mass trauma events.  The trauma informed care framework provides an approach to managing the psychological impact of disasters for patients, families, and health care providers alike.  They write, “Bringing together key personnel and experts within the organization as soon as possible to respond to the varying degrees of expected and unexpected reactions to trauma ensured there was support provided at every level.” 

About Clinical Nurse Specialist

The purpose of Clinical Nurse Specialist ™: the International Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice is to disseminate outcomes of clinical nurse specialist practice, to foster continued development of the clinical nurse specialist role, and to highlight clinical nurse specialist contributions to advancing nursing practice and health policy globally. Clinical Nurse Specialist is the official journal of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in Nursing, Nursing - Practioner and Advanced Practice, Psychiatry, Psychology and Addiction Medicine, Publications | Leave a comment

Wolters Kluwer Health Global Customer Support Team Wins Third Consecutive Omega NorthFace ScoreBoard Award for Customer Service Excellence

New York, NY (February 27, 2014) – Wolters Kluwer Health is pleased to announce that its Global Customer Support team for the Ovid and LWW Journals product lines has received the NorthFace ScoreBoard AwardSM from Omega Management Group Corp for excellence in service during 2013.

This is the third consecutive year the team has received the award. The NorthFace ScoreBoard award is presented annually to companies that exceed expectations in customer satisfaction scores — based solely on direct customer feedback—during the prior calendar year.

“This award is a true reflection of the passion and commitment of our entire global Customer Support organization to exceed our customers’ expectations,” said Timothy Curran, Vice President Customer Support, Wolters Kluwer Health, Medical Research. “We’re very pleased to be recognized by one of the leading customer service assessment organizations for our superior service.”

Omega’s methodology measures customer satisfaction and loyalty levels on a 5-point scale (or equivalent) four times during the year in such categories as technical support, field service, customer service and account management. NorthFace ScoreBoard Award recipients are companies who, based solely on survey responses from their own customers, achieved a 4.0 or above out of a possible 5.0.

“Due to its unique ‘customer-only vote’ criteria, the NorthFace ScoreBoard Award has been viewed from its inception as the only objective benchmark for excellence in customer service,” said John Alexander Maraganis, president & CEO of Omega.  “Our research indicates that companies that consistently achieve a 4.0 rating or above, which we call the ‘Loyalty Zone,’ are succeeding in locking in profitable, long-term customer relationships, and this significantly raises the bar on their competitors.”

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Media, Publications | Leave a comment

Remote Screening Can Help Detect Diabetic Eye Disease, Reports Optometry and Vision Science

‘Hard Exudates’ in Eye Photographs Are Sensitive for Identifying Macular Edema in Patients with Diabetes

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 25, 2014) – An Internet-based screening approach performs well in identifying patients with treatable diabetic eye disease, according to a study in Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of OptometryThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

In the article, “Utility of Hard Exudates for the Screening of Macular Edema,” using digital photographs of the eye taken at the doctor’s office or clinic, eye specialists can reliably detect “hard exudates”—a key early sign of diabetes-related macular edema, reports the new research by Jorge A. Cuadros, OD, PhD, of UC Berkeley School of Optometry and colleagues. “This study offers impressive support for the implementation of remote screening images for patients with diabetes, who are not being seen by eye specialists like optometrists and ophthalmologists,” comments Anthony Adams, OD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Optometry and Vision Science.

Remote Detection of Hard Exudates in Eye Photographs…

The researchers evaluated the use of the EyePACS “tele-ophthalmology” system to detect edema (wetness) resulting from leaky blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye.  This macular edema is one of the most serious vision-threatening changes in the eyes of people with diabetes.

“Edema that is detected close to the line of sight (straight-ahead vision) can and should be treated to slow or avoid any loss of vision,” explains Dr Adams.  “However about one-third of all people with diabetes don’t realize they have diabetes and about 20 percent of those with recently diagnosed already have some changes in the blood vessels at the back of the eye.”

Optometrists and ophthalmologists, with specialized training and instruments, can diagnose macular edema.  However, these services aren’t available or practical everywhere.  In EyePACS and similar remote screening programs, primary care doctors or nurses take digital photographs of the eye, which are then sent for remote viewing and diagnosis by an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

One sign these specialists look for is small yellow “hard exudates”—an indicator of current or very recent edema.  In their study, Dr Cuadros and coauthors sought to determine whether hard exudates in clinic photographs are an accurate indicator of clinically significant macular edema in patients with diabetes.

…Is Sensitive Screening Test for Diabetic Eye Disease

The study included 103 adults with type 2 diabetes, seen at a public health clinic, who were considered at high risk for macular edema.  A special digital camera was used to take a magnified view of the interior of the eye, without the use of eye drops to dilate the pupil.  The photos were sent over the Internet for review by eye specialists, who looked for hard exudates close to the line of sight as an indicator of clinically significant macular edema.

Within a few months, patients returned to the clinic for specialist examination, including dilation of the pupil and stereo views of the interior of the eye—the standard test for diabetic eye disease.  The dilated exams showed clinically significant macular edema in about 15 percent of patients.

Hard exudates detected on the digital photographs were an accurate indicator of macular edema.  “The presence of hard exudates allowed correct detection of actual edema close to 90 percent of the time,” says Dr Adams.  “Just as important, the test was close to 80 percent accurate in correctly identifying when no edema was present.”  Thus the screening procedure had a sensitivity of 90 percent and specificity of 80 percent.

To prevent vision loss, it’s important to identify and treat diabetic eye damage as early as possible.  Remote screening tests have been developed to increase the number of diabetic patients screened for eye disease.  That’s especially important in groups without access to specialist vision care, like the public clinic patients evaluated in the new study.  Dr Cuadros is inventor of the EyePACS system, which is used to screen nearly 36,000 patients each year at the UC Berkeley School of Optometry Digital Health Clinic.

Although further research is needed, the new results show that that remote screening—and specifically the detection of hard exudates in nondilated eye photographs—can accurately identify patients with diabetic eye disease.  Dr Cuadros and coauthors conclude, “Low-cost and reliable methods of detecting clinically significant macular edema, such as the use of a hard exudate surrogate marker described here, are needed to meet the challenge of widespread screening for this vision-threatening condition.”

About Optometry and Vision Science

Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry, is the most authoritative source for current developments in optometry, physiological optics, and vision science. This frequently cited monthly scientific journal has served primary eye care practitioners for more than 75 years, promoting vital interdisciplinary exchange among optometrists and vision scientists worldwide.

About the American Academy of Optometry

Founded in 1922, the American Academy of Optometry is committed to promoting the art and science of vision care through lifelong learning.  All members of the Academy are dedicated to the highest standards of optometric practice through clinical care, education or research.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Optometry, Publications | Leave a comment