Nearly Half of Uninsured Children Live in Immigrant Families, Reports Study in Medical Care

Call for New Approaches to Increase Enrollment for Eligible Children of Immigrant Parents

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 24, 2014) – Children from immigrant families now account for 42 percent of uninsured children in the United States, reports a study in the March issue of Medical CareThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

More than two-thirds of uninsured children with immigrant parents are US citizens, according to an analysis of nationwide survey data by Eric E. Seiber, PhD, of The Ohio State University College of Public Health, Columbus.  He writes, “Initiatives to expand coverage or increase Medicaid and CHIP uptake will require decision makers to develop new policy and outreach approaches to enroll these children so they do not fall behind.”

More Uninsured Children Are From Immigrant Families

Dr Seiber analyzed data from a U.S. Census Bureau survey for the years 2008 to 2010, including more than 2.8 million households annually.  Each year’s data included over 40,000 children living in immigrant families:  those who had either immigrated themselves or had at least one immigrant parent.

By this definition, nearly one fourth of all US children in 2010 were living in immigrant families.  Eighty-six percent of these children were native-born citizens, and another two percent were naturalized citizens.  Thus, only 12 percent of children in immigrant families were non-citizens.

Overall, 42 percent of uninsured children in the survey lived in an immigrant family.  The percentage of uninsured children with immigrant parents ranged from just four percent in Maine to 69 percent in California.  “Having an immigrant parent is a defining characteristic of uninsured children,” Dr Seiber writes.

After adjustment for other factors, children who were not citizens and those born in Latin America were most likely to be uninsured—by about 11 and seven percentage points, respectively.  Language barriers played a role as well.  For children living in a household where Spanish was the primary language, the likelihood of being uninsured was two percentage points higher.

Outreach Needed to Enroll Eligible Children of Immigrant Parents

While previous studies have shown that children living in immigrant families are more likely to be uninsured, less is known about what percentage of uninsured children who are immigrants or have immigrant parents.  In 2000, a key study reported that 36 percent of uninsured children live in immigrant families.

The new results show that “approaching half” of uninsured children in the United States have immigrant parents, according to Dr Seiber.  He adds, “Children living in immigrant families are the group most likely to miss key investments in their health and human capital.”

The Affordable Care Act includes efforts to expand health care coverage to uninsured populations.  But as the new study points out, many children living in immigrant families are uninsured despite being eligible for Medicaid.  “With the future of immigration reform undecided, enrollment groups must provide a safe harbor for citizen children who may have undocumented parents,” according to Dr Seiber.

He urges new policies and outreach efforts to expand health insurance coverage among children living in immigrant families.  “Maine, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New York, and Illinois have been particularly successful in enrolling eligible children with immigrant parents in insurance programs, and are models for the rest of the country,” Dr Seiber notes.  He adds that California has achieved strong results with efforts at overcoming language barriers to Medicaid enrollment.

About Medical Care

Rated as one of the top ten journals in health care administration, Medical Care is devoted to all aspects of the administration and delivery of health care. This scholarly journal publishes original, peer-reviewed papers documenting the most current developments in the rapidly changing field of health care. Medical Care provides timely reports on the findings of original investigations into issues related to the research, planning, organization, financing, provision, and evaluation of health services. In addition, numerous special supplementary issues that focus on specialized topics are produced with each volume. Medical Care is the official journal of the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Public Health, Publications | Leave a comment

Caring for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions—New Research and Future Challenges

Updates from MCC Research Network Presented in Special Issue of Medical Care

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 24, 2014) – The millions of Americans living with more than one chronic disease are at high risk of poor health outcomes, and account for a disproportionate share of health care costs.  A special March supplement to Medical Care presents updates from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) Multiple Chronic Conditions (MCC) Research Network, formed to address knowledge gaps and research challenges in meeting the complex health care needs of this growing population.  The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Meeting the Needs of People with MCC—More Than Just a “Collection of Diseases”

The March special supplement, titled Advancing the Field: Results from the AHRQ Multiple Chronic Conditions Research Network, presents research and commentaries based on grants funded by AHRQ to improve understanding about how to best care for the growing number of people living with multiple chronic conditions (MCC).  The AHRQ MCC Research Network supports the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ (HHS) Multiple Chronic Conditions Strategic Framework and the HHS Initiative on Multiple Chronic Conditions, a public-private sector partnership to address the needs of people living with MCC and the health systems that serve them.  The special issue can be accessed on the Medical Care website.

“This special issue presents important evidence that can help to ensure safe and high quality health care for the growing number of people who live with more than one ongoing condition,” commented AHRQ Director Richard Kronick, PhD.   

It is estimated that more than one-fourth of all Americans, and two-thirds of older adults, are living with MCC— defined as two or more chronic physical or behavioral health problems.  Care for patients with MCC accounts for an estimated two-thirds of the nation’s nearly $3 trillion in total health care spending. As the US population ages, the number of people with MCC is increasing steadily—by 2030, there are expected to be more than 170 million Americans living with at least one chronic condition.

The special issue “captures the state of research on MCC and serves as a model for future research in the field,” according to an introductory editorial by Guest Editors Mary E. Tinetti, MD, of Yale University and Jayasree Basu, PhD, MBA, of AHRQ.

In their overview paper, David Grembowski, PhD and colleagues highlight the need for a new conceptual approach to MCC.  They believe the focus on single conditions needs to be replaced by a model accounting for the “inherent complexity” presented by the mismatch between patients’ needs and the current structure of the health care system.

Similarly, Lisa LeRoy, PhD and coauthors emphasize that caring for patients with MCC involves more than treatment of a “collection of diseases.”  They call for a focus on “holistic outcomes in humans who live meaningful lives in relationship with family and community.”

Research Highlights Importance of Behavioral Health Issues

The supplement includes 12 original research papers, reflecting the range of difficult questions requiring evidence to improve the care of patients with MCC.  Topics include the conditions adding the most to the costs of MCC, sources of “unexplained and potentially unwarranted variations” in treatment for patients with MCC, and the appropriateness of current treatment guidelines for patients with MCC.

A recurring issue is the contribution of behavioral health problems, often coexisting with physical health problems.  Patients with concurrent behavioral health issues may be “particularly vulnerable” to the problems associated with MCC.

But MCC research poses difficult challenges—a “one-size fits all” approach can’t capture the various combinations of conditions and contributing factors seen in patients with MCC.  Drs Tinetti and Basu identify priorities for MCC research, including further development of research methods, and improvement of treatment guidelines and of the health care system’s ability to meet the needs of patients with MCC.

Highlights from the special issue will be presented in a webinar on Tuesday, February 25, 2014, at 3:00 pm EST.  Three researchers from the AHRQ MCC Research Network will discuss topics including the role of clinical practice guidelines in managing patients with MCC, use of the “medical homes” in caring for patients with concurrent physical and mental illness, and approaches to addressing the fragmentation of hospital care for MCC patients.  To register for the webinar, go to https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/541449089.

About AHRQ

AHRQ’s mission is to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable, and affordable, and to work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and other partners to make sure that the evidence is understood and used.

About Medical Care

Rated as one of the top ten journals in health care administration, Medical Care is devoted to all aspects of the administration and delivery of health care. This scholarly journal publishes original, peer-reviewed papers documenting the most current developments in the rapidly changing field of health care. Medical Care provides timely reports on the findings of original investigations into issues related to the research, planning, organization, financing, provision, and evaluation of health services. In addition, numerous special supplementary issues that focus on specialized topics are produced with each volume. Medical Care is the official journal of the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Public Health, Publications | Leave a comment

Color Vision Problems Become More Common with Age, Reports Optometry and Vision Science

Study Finds Color Vision Abnormalities in 40 Percent of Older Adults

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 20, 2014) – Abnormal color vision increases significantly with aging—affecting one-half or more of people in the oldest age groups, reports a study in Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of OptometryThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

While few people younger than 70 have problems with color vision, the rate increases rapidly through later decades of life, according to the new research by Marilyn E. Schneck, PhD, and colleagues of The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco.  They write, “We find the color discrimination declines with age and that the majority of color defects among the older population are of the blue-yellow type.”

Color Vision Abnormalities Increase with Age

The researchers administered color vision tests to a random sample of 865 older adults—age range 58 to 102 years.  The study excluded subjects with any type of congenital color-vision defect (“color blindness.”).  The types and rates of color vision abnormalities were assessed in different age groups.

Overall, 40 percent of the participants had abnormal results on one of the two color vision tests used in the study.  Twenty percent failed both tests.

The failure rate was markedly higher in older age groups.  Although color-vision abnormalities were uncommon in people younger than 70, they were present in about 45 percent of people in their mid-70s, up to 50 percent of those 85 and older, and nearly two-thirds of those in their mid-90s.

Nearly 80 percent of the abnormalities involved confusion of the lighter (pastel) shades of blue versus purple and yellow versus green and yellow-green.  These “blue-yellow” errors are distinct from the “red-green” errors observed in people with inherited color blindness, which affects about eight percent of males and 0.5 percent of females.  Although the two tests had different failure rates, they detected similar frequencies of blue-yellow errors.

More Severe Defects May Affect Daily Functioning

The results confirm previous studies showing that color vision “deteriorates measurably” with aging.  Most subtle aging-related color vision abnormalities are likely to go unnoticed, the researchers suggest.

However, they note that nearly 20 percent of older adults failed the easier of the two tests, “designed to only detect defects sufficiently severe to affect performance in daily life.” Dr Schneck and coauthors note, “These individuals would have problems carrying out some tasks that rely on color vision.”

The researchers discuss factors that may contribute to changes in color vision with aging, and to blue-yellow defects in particular.  These may include reduced pupil size, admitting less light into the eye; increased yellowing of the lens inside the eye; and changes in the sensitivity of the vision pathways.  All of these are known changes with age to the human eye.

Increased rates of eye diseases are another potentially important contributor.  Dr Schneck and coauthors add, “The most common age-related eye diseases (glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic eye disease) all produce blue-yellow color vision anomalies, at least in the preclinical or early stages.”

To read the article, “Comparison of Panel D-15 Tests in a Large Older Population”, please visit http://journals.lww.com/optvissci/Abstract/publishahead/Comparison_of_Panel_D_15_Tests_in_a_Large_Older.99001.aspx

About Optometry and Vision Science

Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry, is the most authoritative source for current developments in optometry, physiological optics, and vision science. This frequently cited monthly scientific journal has served primary eye care practitioners for more than 75 years, promoting vital interdisciplinary exchange among optometrists and vision scientists worldwide.

About the American Academy of Optometry

Founded in 1922, the American Academy of Optometry is committed to promoting the art and science of vision care through lifelong learning.  All members of the Academy are dedicated to the highest standards of optometric practice through clinical care, education or research.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Optometry, Publications | Leave a comment

National Conference for Nurse Practitioners Aims to Improve Quality of Patient Care with Evidence-Based Sessions, Hands-On Workshops

April 23-26, 2014 • Hilton Chicago • Chicago, IL

www.ncnpconference.com

Philadelphia, PA (February 18, 2014) – With increased demand for nurse practitioner care, advanced skills training in evidence-based learning is essential to help improve their overall quality of patient care. Nurse practitioners are invited to attend the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners: The Conference for Primary and Acute Care Clinicians, (www.ncnpconference.com), April 23-26, 2014, at the Hilton Chicago in Chicago, IL. The conference provides a forum for evidence-based educational sessions, hands-on workshops, and skill-building sessions that deliver comprehensive, results-oriented strategies. The conference is sponsored by Wolters Kluwer Health – Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, publisher of The Nurse Practitioner journal.

Nurse practitioners and advanced practice clinicians in primary and acute care settings will learn from top-rated speakers in a variety of sessions on drug updates, chronic pain, laboratory diagnosis, health disparities among LBGT persons, ARDS and asthma, heart failure, dermatology, pediatrics, geriatrics, billing and coding, and more. CE and Rx credit will be awarded.

Participants can earn additional contact hours and extend their learning experience after the conference by visiting www.econferencecenter.com.

“With a strong evidence-based approach to learning, attendees at the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners will gain valuable skills, insight from advanced practitioner educators on a range of topics, and hands-on learning workshops,” said Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, CSP, FAAN, DCC, and conference chairperson. “Plus, we offer easy access to online session content and continuing education, and an opportunity to exchange ideas with your peers.  This is the conference of choice for among advanced practitioners.”

For complete registration information, visit the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners website at www.ncnpconference.com.

Program Highlights

Wednesday, April 23, keynote address: “Awesome Practiced Daily!”

Carol L. Thompson, PhD, DNP, ACNP, FNP, FCCM, FAANP, Professor and Adult-Gerontology Acute Care NP, Concentration Coordinator, Department of Advanced Practice and Doctoral Studies, The University of Tennessee, College of Nursing, Memphis, TN.

Dr. Thompson will characterize ‘awesome’ by the ‘5 C’s:’ Competence, Caring, Coordination, Collaboration, and Compensation.

Breakout sessions, workshops, and skill-building sessions will follow over the course of the conference, including:

  • Making Sense of Diabetes Medications
  • Providing the Annual Medicare Wellness Visit: Effective Strategies for Scheduling, Documenting, Billing, and Coding
  • Advanced Heart Failure: Recognition, Evaluation, and Treatment
  • Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines
  • Helping Your Patients (and you) Find Balance and Calm in a Chaotic Life/Practice
  • Getting Ready for NP Certification
  • Botanicals for Women’s Health
  • Diagnostic Criteria for Managing Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care

Hands-on workshops are incorporated throughout the program and are among the most popular annual offerings. Featured workshops, presented as two-part courses, include “Basic Suturing,” “Common Office Procedures,” “Dermatologic Procedures,” “Orthopedic Assessment/Upper Extremity/Joint Injection,” and “Principles of Splinting.”

Continuing Education/Pharmacology Credit

The 2014 conference offers up to 21.75 contact hours of continuing nursing education and up to 16.5 contact hours can be applied to advanced pharmacology requirements. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins is accredited as an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

About Anthony J. Jannetti, Inc.

Conference management services are provided by Anthony J. Jannetti, Inc., a healthcare management, marketing, and publishing corporation located in Pitman, NJ (www.ajj.com).

Members of the press are invited to attend the conference and interview speakers and exhibitors. A complimentary one-day pass will be granted to members of the press. An editorial production timeline will be requested. For more information, contact Connie Hughes at (646) 674-6348 or via e-mail at Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in Nursing, Publications | Leave a comment

Front-line Nurses to Meet, Collaborate and Learn from Industry Experts At Nursing2014 Symposium

March 27 29, 2014 • Las Vegas Hotel • Las Vegas, NVPhiladelphia, PA (February 12, 2014) – Nurses from across the country will convene at Nursing2014 Symposium: The Conference for Clinical Excellence to network and attend sessions that reflect the evolution and innovations in nursing practice. The symposium will be held March 27-29, 2014, at the Las Vegas Hotel in Las Vegas, NV. The conference is sponsored by Wolters Kluwer Health – Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, publisher of Nursing2014.

The symposium is designed to provide attendees a “live from the pages” experience of the Nursing2014 award-winning journal, to an opportunity where nurses can learn, meet and collaborate in person to strengthen their clinical skills and current evidence-based initiatives.

“We’re particularly excited this year because the program reaches even more deeply into evidence based initiatives and new clinical areas,” said Nursing2014 Editor-in-Chief Linda Laskowski-Jones, RN, MS, ACNS-BC, CEN, FAWM. “The faculty is exceptional and we’ve added topics that are relevant to the many changes going on in health care today.”

The meeting is designed for nurses at all levels and who practice in a wide variety of health care settings. Advanced track sessions are offered for advanced practice clinicians. There are also courses designed for nurses in direct care positions and sessions geared for those who want to hone leadership skills. In addition, the symposium includes sessions offering significant pharmacology content.

Symposium attendees will also earn contact hours and pharmacology credits, connect with colleagues, and meet with vendors and industry representatives in the exhibit hall.

For complete program and registration information, visit the Nursing2014 Symposium Web site at Nursing2014 Symposium.

Program Highlights

Four preconference workshops will be offered Thursday, March 27: “Med-Surg Certification Review Course”; “Let’s Get Messy: Hands-On Anatomy, Resuscitation and Emergency Skills Lab”; “Pharmacology Uncovered: A Review of the Basic Principles of Pharmacotherapeutics”; and “Clinical Pharmacology: A Review of Major Classes of Drugs.” Later that day, Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN, President, Paws to Learn, delivers the Opening Address, “Nurse’s Habits: ‘But That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It!’”

Friday, March 28, keynote address to be delivered by Tiffany Christensen, Life-Long Patient and Duke Hospital Patient Advocate, entitled “Partnering with Patients – A Bed’s-Eye View of Patient and Family-Centered Care.”

Breakout session topics include caring for heart failure patients, medication safety, robotic surgery, acute liver failure, infectious disease, and weight management strategies.

General session, “Documentation and Liability: How What You Write Can Show Up in Court,” will be presented by Edie Brous, RN, MS, BSN, MPH, Esq., Nurse Attorney. The symposium will end with the closing session, “Help! Is Anyone Here a Nurse?” by Laskowski-Jones, discussing how nurses can prepare themselves to handle unexpected medical emergencies outside a health care facility.

Registration Information

Complete information and online registration is available at www.nursingsymposium.com. For additional information, contact Wolters Kluwer Health at 1-800-346-7844, ext. 18850 or 18851.

Continuing Nursing Education

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW), publisher of Nursing2014, will award a maximum of 21 contact hours for this continuing nursing education activity.

LWW is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. This activity is also provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 11749 for 21 contact hours. LWW is also an approved provider by the District of Columbia and Florida #50-1223. Certificates are is valid in all states.

Pharmacology Credit

There are many sessions with significant pharmacology content, and up to 12.25 contact hours can be applied to advanced pharmacology requirements.

 

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

About Anthony J. Jannetti, Inc.

Conference management services are provided by Anthony J. Jannetti, Inc., a healthcare management, marketing, and publishing corporation located in Pitman, NJ (www.ajj.com). 

Members of the press are invited to attend the conference and interview speakers and exhibitors. A complimentary one-day pass will be granted to members of the press. An editorial production timeline will be requested. For more information, contact Connie Hughes at (646) 674-6348 or via e-mail at Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in Nursing, Nursing - Administration Management & Leadership, Publications | Leave a comment

Wolters Kluwer Health to Publish Dermatologic Surgery

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 10, 2014) – Wolters Kluwer Health and the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery today announced an agreement to publish the Society’s official journal, Dermatologic Surgery, in print, online and digital formats effective with the June 2014 issue.

“We are excited to expand the journal’s reach both digitally and globally with the Wolters Kluwer Health publishing team. An important goal in evolving the journal is to deliver multimedia content to our member physicians across the multiple access channels they use today—increasingly that’s on mobile devices,” said Katherine Duerdoth, CAE, Executive Director of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery.

Dermatologic Surgery provides in-depth coverage of cosmetic and reconstructive skin surgery and skin cancer through peer-reviewed original articles, extensive illustrations, case reports, features, literature reviews and correspondence. The monthly journal is exclusively devoted to dermatologic surgery with comprehensive coverage on cutaneous laser surgery, soft-tissue fillers, skin resurfacing, hair transplantation, phlebology, liposuction and skin cancer surgery.

“We’re delighted to have been selected by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery to publish its official journal and position it for growth,” said Jayne Marks, Vice President Publishing, Wolters Kluwer Health, Medical Research. “Dermatologic Surgery is an important, prestigious addition to our portfolio of complementary titles that will bring opportunities for new distribution and advertising channels while elevating its brand internationally.”

About the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS)
ASDS
was founded in 1970 to promote excellence in the subspecialty of dermatologic surgery and foster the highest standards of patient care.

Dermatologic surgery is the discipline that deals with the diagnosis and surgical, reconstructive and cosmetic treatment of diseases of the skin, hair and nails, including skin cancer and rejuvenation of aging skin. The Society is the largest specialty group in dermatology and represents the fastest growing segment of dermatologic practice. ASDS supports clinical and basic research grants; continuing education and the training of its members; legislative and regulatory advocacy; dissemination of public information and community outreach programs. Visit www.asds.net.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow the official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Dermatology, Publications, Surgery | Leave a comment

Teens Who Consume Energy Drinks More Likely to Use Alcohol and Drugs

Widespread Adolescent Energy Drink/Shot Use Strongly Associated with Substance Use, Says Study in Journal of Addiction Medicine

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 3, 2014) – Nearly one-third of US adolescents consume high-caffeine energy drinks or “shots,” and these teens report higher rates of alcohol, cigarette, or drug use, reports a study in the January/February Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction MedicineThe journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

The same characteristics that attract young people to consume energy drinks—such as being “sensation-seeking or risk-oriented”—may make them more likely to use other substances as well, suggests the new research by Yvonne M. Terry-McElrath, MSA, and colleagues of the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

High Use of Energy Drinks/Shots by US Teens…

The researchers analyzed nationally representative data on nearly 22,000 US secondary school students (eighth, tenth, and twelfth graders).  The teens were participants in the University of Michigan’s “Monitoring the Future” study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

In response to questionnaires, about 30 percent of teens reported using caffeine-containing energy drinks or shots.  More than 40 percent said they drank regular soft drinks every day, while 20 percent drank diet soft drinks daily.

Boys were more likely to use energy drinks than girls.  Use was also higher for teens without two parents at home and those whose parents were less educated.  Perhaps surprisingly, the youngest teens (eighth graders) were most likely to use energy drinks/shots.

Students who used energy drinks/shots were also more likely to report recent use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs.  Across age groups and with adjustment for other factors, teens who used energy drinks/shots were two or three times more likely to report other types of substance use, compared to those who didn’t use energy drinks.

Soft drink consumption was also related to substance use.  However, the associations were much stronger for energy drinks/shots.

…May Have Implications for Risk of Substance Use

Energy drinks and shots are products containing high doses of caffeine, marketed as aids to increasing energy, concentration, or alertness.  Studies in young adults suggest that consumption of energy drinks is associated with increased use of alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco.

In young adults, energy drinks have been linked to behavioral patterns of “sensation-seeking or risk orientation.”  Energy drinks are often used together with alcohol, which may “mask” the intoxicating effects of alcohol.  The new study is one of the first to look at consumption of energy drinks by US adolescents, and how they may be related to other types of substance use.

“The current study indicates that adolescent consumption of energy drinks/shots is widespread and that energy drink users also report heightened risk for substance use,” Terry-McElrath and colleagues write.  They emphasize that their study provides no cause-and-effect data showing that energy drinks lead to substance abuse in teens.

However, the researchers believe that the findings linking energy drinks to substance use in young adults are likely relevant to adolescents as well.  They write, “[E]ducation for parents and prevention efforts among adolescents should include education on the masking effects of caffeine in energy drinks on alcohol- and other substance-related impairments, and recognition that some groups (such as high sensation–seeking youth) may be particularly likely to consume energy drinks and to be substance users.”

Even without the possible link to substance use, Terry-McElrath and coauthors note that, with their high caffeine and sugar content, energy drinks and shots aren’t a good dietary choice for teens.  They cite a recent American Academy of Pediatrics report stating that “[C]affeine and other stimulant substances contained in energy drinks have no place in the diet of children and adolescents.”

About Journal of Addiction Medicine

The mission of Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, is to promote excellence in the practice of addiction medicine and in clinical research as well as to support Addiction Medicine as a mainstream medical specialty.  Published quarterly, the Journal is designed for all physicians and other mental health professionals who need to keep up-to-date with the treatment of addiction disorders. Under the guidance of an esteemed Editorial Board, peer-reviewed articles published in the Journal focus on developments in addiction medicine as well as on treatment innovations and ethical, economic, forensic, and social topics.

About the American Society of Addiction Medicine

The American Society of Addiction Medicine is a professional society representing over 3,000 physicians and associated professionals dedicated to increasing access and improving quality of addiction treatment; educating physicians and the public; supporting research and prevention; and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Psychiatry, Psychology and Addiction Medicine, Publications | Leave a comment

Wolters Kluwer Health Transitions the Journal Medicine to Fully Open Access, Broad-Based Biomedical Title in 2015

Medicine’s Highly Respected Editorial Board Now Accepting Open Access Content 

New York, NY (February 5, 2014) – Wolters Kluwer Health, a leading global provider of information for healthcare professionals and students, today announced that Medicine, one of the most respected and frequently cited journals in general medicine, will transition to an open access publication from a subscription-based model. Medicine will provide authors with a distinctive new service offering continuous publication of original research across a broad spectrum of medical scientific disciplines and sub-specialties.

As an open access title, Medicine will continue to provide authors with an established, trusted platform for the publication of their work. In addition, Medicine will provide author tools for ongoing promotion of published articles and data on article usage. To ensure the ongoing quality of Medicine’s content, the peer-review process will only accept content that is scientifically, technically and ethically sound, and in compliance with standard reporting guidelines. Medicine is indexed in MEDLINE® with an Impact Factor of 4.233 based on the latest Journal Citation Reports® (ranking 18th in General & Internal Medicine specialty).

“Providing our partners, authors, and readers with greater access and distribution options to peer-reviewed content is essential to how medical content is consumed by practitioners today. Open access publishing strategies are part of this channel mix,” said Jayne Marks, Vice President Publishing, Wolters Kluwer Health, Medical Research.

Medicine will continue to offer subscribers a complete volume of content for 2014, while accepting submissions under the new open access model. The journal will transition from subscription to a fully open access title in 2015.

Open access articles in Medicine will be freely available to read, download, and share from the time of publication. Articles will be published under the terms of the Creative Commons License 4.0, which enables authors to retain copyright while allowing others to copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work. Medicine will use article payment charges (APCs), applied to accepted manuscripts only. The APC covers the cost of the publication process, including peer-reviewing, editing, publishing, maintaining, and archiving.

About Medicine

Medicine® provides insight from leading scholars about the latest results in clinical investigation. Relevant to both hospital and office practice, the journal currently includes analytical reviews of Internal Medicine, Dermatology, Neurology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry topics. Articles typically include original patient data from the author’s own experience along with a scholarly review of the literature.

Medicine® also offers follow-up studies, practice-oriented reports of clinical observations, and “Reviews in Molecular Medicine,” monographs that focus on how the “new genetics” and genomics have altered understanding and management of a particular disorder. It is one of the most respected and frequently cited journals in the field.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Internal Medicine, Publications | Leave a comment

Innovative Technique Creates Large Skin Flaps for Full-Face Resurfacing

Chinese Surgeons Develop ‘Monoblock’ Flaps to Reconstruct Severe Facial Defects, Reports The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

Philadelphia, Pa. (February 5, 2014) – Patients with massive burns causing complete loss of the facial skin pose a difficult challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Now a group of surgeons in China have developed an innovative technique for creating a one-piece skin flap large enough to perform full-face resurfacing, reports The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Dr. QingFeng Li and colleagues of Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine describe their approach to creating “monoblock” flaps for use in extensive face skin resurfacing. In their successful experience with five severely disfigured patients, the full-face tissue flap “provides universally matched skin and near-normal facial contour.”

New Technique Grows One-Piece Skin Flaps for Full-Face Resurfacing

Complete destruction of the facial skin and underlying (subcutaneous) tissues presents “the most challenging dilemma” in facial reconstructive surgery. Multiple skin flaps and grafts are needed to provide complete coverage, creating a “patchwork” appearance. Standard skin grafts are also too bulky to provide good reconstruction of the delicate features and expressive movement of the normal facial skin.

To meet these challenges, Dr. Li and colleagues have developed a new technique for creating a single, large skin flap appropriate for use in full-face resurfacing. Their approach starts with “prefabrication” of a flap of the patient’s own skin, harvested from another part of the body. The skin flap, along with its carefully preserved blood supply, is allowed to grow for some weeks in a “pocket” created under the patient’s skin of the patient’s upper chest.

Tissue expanders—balloon-like devices gradually filled with saline solution—are used to enlarge the skin flap over time. While skin expansion is a standard technique for creation of skin flaps, Dr. Li and his team used an “overexpansion” approach to create very large flaps of relatively thin skin—ideal for use in the facial area. In some cases, when the skin flap was growing too thin, stem cells derived from the patients’ own bone marrow were used as an aid to tissue expansion.

Using this technique, Dr. Li and colleagues were able to create very large skin flaps—up to 30 × 30 cm—for use in full-face resurfacing. In the new article, they describe their use of their prefabrication/overexpansion technique in five patients with complete loss of the facial skin, caused by flame or chemical burns. All patients had previously undergone facial reconstruction, but were left with severe deformity and limited facial movement.

The “monoblock” allowed the surgeons to perform complete facial resurfacing using a single flap of the patient’s own skin. The large flap size avoided problems with a “patchwork” appearance, while the thin flap width was well-suited for reconstruction of the facial features.

Multiple surgeries were needed to refine the results and to manage complications. However, all five patients eventually achieved a more normal appearance and better functioning—including improved emotional expression.

The researchers emphasize that their patients with massive facial burns, while severely disfigured, differ from those with deeper tissue destruction who are candidates for face transplantation. Patients being considered for face transplantation have destruction not only of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, but also of the underlying facial muscles and organs of the head and neck.

Dr. Li and coauthors believe their technique, although complex, provides a valuable new approach to reconstruction for patients with complete destruction of the facial skin. They conclude, “It is a reliable and an excellent reconstructive option for massive facial skin defects.” 

About The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery serves as a forum of communication for all those involved in craniofacial and maxillofacial surgery. Coverage ranges from practical aspects of craniofacial surgery to the basic science that underlies surgical practice. Affiliates include 14 major specialty societies around the world, including the American Association of Pediatric Plastic Surgeons, the American Academy of Pediatrics Section of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, the American Society of Craniofacial Surgeons, the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Argentine Society of Plastic Surgery Section of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, the Asian Pacific Craniofacial Association, the Association of Military Plastic Surgeons of the U.S., the Brazilian Society of Craniofacial Surgeons, the European Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the International Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Japanese Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Korean Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Thai Cleft and Craniofacial Association, and the World Craniofacial Foundation.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Connie Hughes
Director, Marketing Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research
+1 (646) 674-6348
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com

Posted in All Medicine, Publications, Surgery - General, Surgery - Plastic and Reconstructive | Leave a comment

Wolters Kluwer Health Improves Software That Provides Trusted Answers to Clinicians’ Point-of-Care Questions

Lippincott Advisor Features New Touch-Screen Interface and Enhanced User Workflow

PHILADELPHIA (Feb. 4, 2014) – Wolters Kluwer Health, a leading global provider of information and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry, today announced that Lippincott’s Nursing Advisor is getting a usability facelift and a new, shorter name.  Now called “Lippincott Advisor” to better reflect its growing use beyond nursing, the leading online clinical decision-support solution used at the bedside features a clean, new look and improved navigation and search.

While keeping all of its trusted content and features loved by nurses, Lippincott Advisor has been enhanced to deliver an even more user-friendly experience.  The product now includes flat-screen technology and a new touch-friendly layout — putting its power at the clinician’s fingertip.  In addition, the icons are now bathed in vivid colors and have been organized so the content is even easier to navigate.

The software facilitates even faster access to topics and entries and a fully updated search capability.  Users now can search all content or any single topic set from any screen, or use pull-down menus and a new alphabetical index to quickly find the answers they need.  Customization features also have been boosted, including the ability for administrators to add facility name and/or logo and to choose an alternate landing page.

“Lippincott Advisor is now even more user friendly and easier to navigate,” said Judith McCann, MSN, RN, Chief Nurse, Professional & Education, Wolters Kluwer Health.  “We’re going to continue to ensure that all of our customers get the best, most up-to-date decision-support information available immediately when and where they need it.”

At the same time, the name change allows Wolters Kluwer Health to move forward in expanding the product to reach other clinical disciplines.  In addition to nurses, many customers are providing access to the product as a knowledge resource for clinical educators, technicians, therapists, assistants and practitioners.

“We are already seeing other clinicians and non-clinical departments within hospitals use the product, including diagnostics labs, health information management departments, transcriptionists and billing centers,” continued McCann.  “We’ll begin expanding additional content into these other areas over time based on market research and customer request.”

In January, Wolters Kluwer Health announced a similar expansion strategy for Lippincott Procedures™, one of the leading online point-of-care procedure solutions for clinicians, and a sister product to Lippincott Advisor.  Originally designed specifically for nurses, Lippincott Procedures also is being marketed to a broader customer base including both nursing and non-nursing clinicians.

Lippincott Advisor, part of the Lippincott Nursing Solutions suite, is available as a group subscription to hospitals and other healthcare facilities.  The product is accessible from any Internet-enabled device, including PCs and mobile devices such as iPad and Android tablets.  To learn more or to purchase, visit LippincottSolutions.com/Advisor, or call 855-695-5070, and follow Lippincott Nursing Solutions on Twitter @NurseSolutions.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health’s customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Contacts:

Robert Dekker
Director of Communications
Wolters Kluwer Health
+1 (215) 521-8928
Robert.Dekker@wolterskluwer.com

Tom Kivett
Managing Director
Kivett & Company Communications
212-727-2935
tkivett@kivettandco.com

Posted in Nursing, Technology | Leave a comment